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Baby Vaughn our Baby of The Week

Baby Vaughn our Baby of The Week

It's time for our Baby of the Week! This week's featured baby is Vaughn Evanoff, and his mama Rhiannon. FB: How old is Vaughn, and how long have you been cloth diapering for? Rhiannon: He is 18 months, and we have cloth diapered for 16 months. FB: What is his favorite food? Rhiannon: "Numnama" (banana) FB: Why did you make the cloth diaper switch? Rhiannon: For the planet and for the cost savings! FB: What is your favorite aspect of cloth diapering? Rhiannon: Never having to run to the store because we always have diapers! FB: Do you have any tips for moms making the switch? Rhiannon: Once you get your system in place it is so easy! I have two hampers on the go always, and a few wet bags for travel so I always have a place to put wet diapers when the other bags are in the wash. FB: What is your funniest cloth diaper moment? Rhiannon: My husband refers to the red FuzziBunz with white snaps as Vaughn's "Super Mario" diaper, haha. Make sure to use code FLUFFLOVE for an extra 10% off of everything online. To have your baby featured as our baby of the week, please email a photo to social@fuzzibunz.com -

Diaper Rash

Diaper Rash

Whether you use disposable diapers or cloth diapers, at some point your child may develop a diaper rash. It is true that diaper rashes are much less common when using cloth diapers, but it can still happen and I'd like to take a moment to outline the different types of rashes, and some of the best methods for treating each one. Rash from build­up When you have been using your cloth diapers for a while, you may begin to develop build­up in your inserts and other absorbent parts of the diapers. This can be caused by a number of factors,but is mainly caused by detergent residues left behind from inadequate rinsing, mineral accumulation from hard water, or residues left from ointments/creams. If the build­up gets to be bad enough, not only can repelling and leaking occur, but skin irritation can also occur, leading to diaper rash. In order to remove build­up from your diapers, you will need to strip them. Our Strip Rx solution works wonderfully well at cutting through residues and rinsing your diapers clean! Alternately, you can do the following: 1) Start with clean diapers 2) For top loaders, fill your washing machine to the max with hot water. For HE front ­loaders, I recommend stripping in your bathtub or in a large, clean receptacle like a garbage bin. 3) Drop 4 ­ 5 Tablespoons of Oxo­Brite (or OxiClean) into the water, add your diapers, and allow the washing machine to begin agitating (or agitate the diapers manually with your hands, enough to work the solution into the diapers). 4) Allow the diapers to agitate for a couple of minutes, then stop the cycle and close the lid to keep the heat in (or simply let the diapers rest in the water if you are stripping them in your tub/receptacle). 5) Let the diapers soak for at least 6 hours, up to overnight. 6) Drain the tub, and transfer the diapers to your washing machine (if you stripped them in the tub). Run one or two full hot wash cycles with no detergent. 7) Dry on low heat or hang to dry. While stripping the diapers, try to allow your child as much naked time as possible to assist in healing the rash. You may also use safe and gentle baby powders such as Bee All Natural's Baby Powder (http://www.beeallnatural.com/Organic_Baby_Powder_Natural_p/bp­n.htm). If you prefer a paste, add a little warm water to some of the powder and mix! Once the diapers have been stripped, make sure to check your wash routine to ensure that there is enough water being used to properly rinse and wash the diapers. Also check to make sure you aren't using too little/too much detergent, and that the detergent you are using does not contain scents, dyes, fabric softeners, optical brighteners, or enzymes. Rash from yeast This type of rash can seem like one of the most difficult to treat, because if you don't get rid of the yeast infection, as well as the yeast bacteria and yeast spores in your diapers, it is possible to re-infect your child, resulting in a frustrating cycle of rashes, stripping, and discomfort. Once you have eliminated the actual infection, it's time to remove all traces from your cloth diapers. While bleach will kill yeast bacteria, it will not eliminate yeast spores. In addition to this fact, bleach in itself is not the safest or gentlest option to use with your cloth diapers. The following method has been proven to kill the bacteria and spores that can re­-infect your Little One, and is a fairly simple process (from http://www.mommyscraftobsession.com/2013/01/the-yeast­monster­how­to­properlystrip.html): 1. Rinse your diapers to get the stinkies washed out a little 2. Do a regular wash with no soap 3. Rinse the diapers three times 4. Add eight to ten drops of Tea Tree Oil and wash your diapers on regular 5. Rinse diapers 6. Rinse them again Optional Step (if you have yeast spores in the diaper, this is a must): Add five drops of Grapefruit Seed Extract Optional Step: Rinse diapers 7.Wash diapers with Cloth Diaper detergent 8. Rinse Diapers 9. Switch to dryer on HIGH or sun dry If ­ while treating your child's infection ­ you need to use topical anti­fungal creams or ointments, it is highly recommended that you use disposable diaper liners that completely cover the inside of the diapers. If you choose to use cloth liners, do NOT wash them with your cloth diapers. They must be washed separately to avoid "re­-infecting" the diapers. Rash due to sensitive skin Some children have very sensitive skin which may react noticeably to certain products and materials. For some children, cloth diapers made of synthetic fibers are not compatible and only natural fiber fabrics will do. For others, the texture of the diapers and inserts used will make all of the difference. If your child has sensitive skin, you may need to experiment with different types of cloth diapers, detergents, and rash solutions to find what works best for you and your child. Rash due to prolonged exposure to urine/feces Obviously urine and feces are going to touch your child's skin during their diaper­wearing years, but sometimes very acidic bodily fluids, or irritation caused by frequent bowel movements can cause mild to severe diaper rash. To try and soothe irritation, make sure you are changing your baby often and/or give him or her plenty of naked time if you can. A calming, gentle baby powder can ease pain and discomfort, and warm baths may bring relief. Rash due to change in diet As your baby transitions from breast milk or formula to solid foods, you may suddenly notice diaper rashes appearing. When new foods are introduced, the frequency and composition of your child's stools changes, which can lead to diaper rash. Allergies and food sensitivities are sometimes a culprit as well, so be sure to observe whether or not certain foods cause flare-ups. In addition, sometimes breastfed children develop diaper rashes in response to something his/her mother eats. Again, just observe to see if a certain food or drink causes a flare-up, and try to eliminate that food for a period to see if the rash clears up. Rash due to chafing While you want your diapers to fit snugly, a diaper that is too loose or too tight can cause uncomfortable chafing, leading to diaper rash. Make sure that your diapers fit snugly enough so that you can fit one finger underneath the elastics at the legs and waist, but not so tight that the diaper leaves painful­ or "angry­" looking red marks when the diaper is removed. Light red marks are normal and expected, just as what you would observe when taking off your socks or underwear. Have you ever dealt with diaper rash? What are some of your best remedies?

Sweet Liliahna - Baby of The Week

Sweet Liliahna - Baby of The Week

It's time once again for our Baby of the Week! This is week #3, and we are so glad you are here with us to welcome baby Liliahna, and her mama, Naomi! Naomi and baby Liliahna have just started their cloth diapering journey (it's been one month!) and are happily sharing their experience with us thus far. FB: How old is Liliahna? Naomi: She is 6 months old. FB: Has she started solids? If so, what is her favorite food? Naomi: She is exclusively breastfed, but likes gnawing on apples and carrots. No teeth yet. ;) FB: Why did you make the cloth diaper switch? Naomi: I initially planned on using cloth from day obe but did not have the adequate amount of diapers to keep up with a newborn and her many changes. So I decided once the newborn stage was over and I had a chance to add to my small stash, I’d immediately switch! I also chose cloth because of the IMMENSE financial savings and because I didn’t like the idea of having chemical filled diapers on my baby’s soft new baby bum all day. Disposables really scarred her precious skin from all the friction and I hated seeing her skin get chapped and scraped :( it was leaving scars FB: What is your favorite aspect of cloth diapering? Naomi: Not ever having to think, UGH Im almost out of diapers AGAIN!” We use cloth wipes as well and I love that we don’t have trash bags full of diapers and wipes piling up in our home nor in a landfill. Plus, she looks so adorable in them! It makes me so happy that she’s comfy FB: Do you have any tips for moms making the switch? Naomi: Talk to someone who has no issues with laundry routine and establish a good one before its to late! I’m glad I was able to find great help and started out on the right foot! It truly is SO easy and affordable. Want to have your baby be our baby of the week?  Send your photos to social@fuzzibunz.com.  Make sure to use code FLUFFLOVE to receive an extra 10% off of ALL purchases :)

Leakage Prevention

Leakage Prevention

At some point during your cloth diapering experience, you'll most likely experience a leak. Maybe more. Maybe a LOT more.
And while some leaks happen when a diaper change is a bit overdue, or when a child suddenly starts peeing ocean-like volumes all at one time, many times leaks are cause by something minor that a little tweaking will fix.
Here is a guide to figuring out what type of leak you have, and how to resolve it!
  1. Compression Leaks - Compression leaks are fun little occurrences that can cause massive amounts of frustration and many wardrobe changes throughout the day. These are caused by excess pressure against the diaper, such as when a child is strapped into the carseat, sitting in a bouncer, wearing a too-tight onesie, or snugly pressed against your hip as you walk around trying to do chores one-handed.Compression leaks almost always occur at the leg openings, and can often leave cute little crescent-shaped wet spots on your or your child's clothing. To remedy compression leaks, there are a few options:
  • Change your baby more often. The average recommended time to go between changing a cloth diaper is between 2 - 3 hours, but if you're getting compression leaks after an hour or two, try to time diaper changes a bit earlier.
  • Double up the inserts. Sometimes using two microfiber inserts instead of one allows for a "back-up" source of absorbency to collect what is squeezed out of the first one. While this can be effective, it can also be bulky unless you use a natural fiber insert like hemp, bamboo, or cotton, which leads me to the third option:
  • Natural fiber inserts. While microfiber is a fantastic, thirsty material, it is also quite spongy, and thus is the more common culprit of compression leaks. Natural fiber inserts such as those listed above have more tightly-woven fibers, making compression leaks virtually impossible. You can use them on their own, or pair them up with a microfiber insert or another natural-fiber insert for a great solution to leaks!
  1. Leaks from improper fit
This can be tricky if you're using a sized diaper because the options for adjusting the diapers are usually limited to hip and leg snaps. To get the best fit with a sized diaper, always secure the leg snaps first, and then secure the hip snaps. Make sure that the legs are tight enough that you can only slide one finger beneath the elastics.
With our One Size diapers, getting a good fit is much more attainable thanks to fully-adjustable buttonhole elastics. The most common leak zone that I see when fit is the issue is from the leg openings. This usually occurs because the front area of the leg opening is too loose, which causes gaps when a child is sitting or lying in certain positions, which causes leaks.
Even though the front ends of our leg elastics are designed as anchors, I always recommend adjusting this side of the elastics as well as the back. To do this, turn your diapers completely inside-out, and you will be able to access the front ends of each leg elastic (the ends closest to the front tummy panel of the diaper), as well as the back ends of each leg elastic (the ends closest to the waist elastic at the back of the diaper). Start out by securing your buttons at the same button hole on each side (i.e; set the front ends to 4 and the back ends to 4), and then re-adjust if needed, one button hole at a time until you find the perfect fit.
  1. Leaks from repelling inserts
Repelling is caused when residues from detergent, fabric softeners, diaper creams, or minerals from your water accumulate in the fibers of your diapers and create a "coating" of sorts which repels liquids instead of absorbing them. Over time, most cloth diaper users will find that their diapers do not absorb as well as they used to, in which case you will simply need to strip them to restore absorbency.
There are many different ways to strip your diapers, but the two that I have found to be the most effective are to either use our Strip Rx (link to product here), or to strip with an oxygenated bleach using the following method:
  • Start with clean diapers
  • For top loaders, fill your washing machine to the max with hot water. For HE front-loaders, I recommend stripping in your bathtub or in a large, clean receptacle like a garbage bin.
  • Drop 4 - 5 Tablespoons of Oxo-Brite into the water, add your diapers, and allow the washing machine to begin agitating (or agitate the diapers manually with your hands, enough to work the solution into the diapers).
  • Allow the diapers to agitate for a couple of minutes, then stop the cycle and close the lid to keep the heat in (or simply let the diapers rest in the water if you are stripping them in your tub/receptacle).
  • Let the diapers soak for at least 6 hours, up to overnight.
  • Resume the cycle if you are stripping the diapers in your washing machine, or drain the bathtub and transfer the diapers to your washing machine. Run one or two full hot wash cycles with no detergent.
  • Dry on low heat or hang to dry.
This is usually all that is needed to restore absorbency to your diapers, though a second stripping may be necessary if you have severe build-up.
If the build-up is caused from using the wrong kind of detergent, from using fabric softeners (which are a no-no), or from using problematic diaper creams/ointments, strip the diapers and then begin fresh with an approprate detergent free of scents, dyes, optical brighteners, fabric softeners, and enzymes. Avoid fabric softeners (even with regular household laundry), and use only cloth-diaper safe rash solutions. One of our favorites is "Bee All Natural Baby Powder!" (link to product)
  1. Leaks from oversaturation
This one is pretty self-explanatory, and is simply when the inserts become saturated to the point where they can no longer hold any more liquid. Cloth diapers are pretty darn absorbent, but they do have limits, and at some point an insert's threshold for absorption is going to max out. Making sure to change your child at regular intervals and doubling-up when necessary will prevent soggy bottoms and spoiled outfits.
Hopefully this list of common types of leaks and their most effective solutions will help you in the instance that you have to deal with one. If you find that you can't seem to resolve the issue on your own, make sure to reach out to your retailer or customer support (you can reach us here: help@fuzzibunz.com)
Use code 'elastics' for 10% off of replacement elastics. ~ Lindsay Lewis

Baby Parker

Baby Parker

It's time once again for our Baby of the Week!! Let's welcome our Week 2 Baby, Parker, and his mama, Shauna! Parker is 6 months old and still fairly new to cloth, but Shauna tells us about their experience so far. FB: What is Parker's favorite food? Shauna: We have only recently introduced solids, but so far homemade green beans are in the lead! FB: How long have you been cloth diapering? Shauna: Parker is our third child, and the first we have cloth diapered, so 6 months. FB: Why did you make the cloth diaper switch? Shauna: We originally decided to cloth for cost savings and a reduction of trash in the environment, both of which have been wonderful, but our little guy has sensitive skin which is not irritated at all by cloth diapers and wipes so we knew we made the right decision for him! FB: What is your favorite component/aspect of cloth diapering? Shauna: For my husband it is not having to rush to the store when our diaper supply is low. For me, I cannot resist our little guy's adorable fluffy butt! FB: Do you have any tips for moms making the switch? Shauna: Do not commit to one brand straight away. There may be good deals on certain brands if you buy more at one time, but if they do not work for your little one you are stuck with an inadequate stash until you can invest in those that work well. FB: Do you have a "Funniest Cloth Diaper Moment?" Shauna: Well, we haven't had many as we are still newbies, but watching my husband put on a CD for the first time was rather amusing to me!   Discount: Use code BOTW to receive 10% off of the perfect size cloth diaper.